Side effects of the fever-reducing drugs

side effects of fever reducing drugs

There are plenty of fever reducing drugs on the market, Most of them have some side effects. Let’s find our more about them.

Ibuprofen (Nurofen)

ibuprofen-side-effects

Common side effects

The common side effects of ibuprofen taken by mouth happen in more than 1 in 100 people. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if these side effects bother you or don’t go away:

  • headaches
  • feeling dizzy
  • feeling sick (nausea)
  • being sick (vomiting)
  • wind
  • indigestion

Serious side effects

Call a doctor straight away if you have:

  • black poo or blood in your vomit – these can be signs of bleeding in your stomach
  • swollen ankles, blood in your pee or not peeing at all – these can be signs of a kidney problem
  • severe chest or stomach pain – these can be signs of a hole in your stomach or gut
  • difficulty breathing, or asthma symptoms that become worse

Serious allergic reaction

In rare cases, it’s possible to have a serious allergic reaction to ibuprofen.

Aspirin

Like all medicines, aspirin can cause side effects although not everyone gets them.

Common side effects

Common side effects of aspirin as fever reducing drug happen in more than 1 in 100 people. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if the side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • mild indigestion
  • bleeding more easily than usual – aspirin thins your blood it can sometimes make you bleed more easily. For example, you may get nosebleeds, bruise more easily, and if you cut yourself, the bleeding may take longer than normal to stop.

Serious side effects

It happens rarely, but some people have serious side effects after taking aspirin.

Call a doctor straight away if you get:

  • red, blistered and peeling skin
  • coughing up blood or blood in your pee, poo or vomit
  • yellow skin or the whites of your eyes turn yellow – this can be a sign of liver problems
  • painful joints in the hands and feet – this can be a sign of high levels of uric acid in the blood
  • swollen hands or feet – this can be a sign of water retention

Naproxen (Naprosyn, Stirlescent, Feminax Ultra, Period Pain Reliever, Boots Period Pain Relief)

Common side effects

Common side effects of naproxen happen in more than 1 in 100 people.

They include:

  • confusion
  • headaches
  • ringing in the ears
  • changes in vision
  • tiredness and feeling sleepy
  • dizziness
  • rashes

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if these side effects bother you or do not go away.

Serious side effects

Call your doctor straight away if you have:

  • severe indigestion, heartburn, pains in your stomach, feeling or being sick (nausea or vomiting) or diarrhoea – these can be signs of an ulcer or inflammation in the stomach or gut
  • vomiting blood or dark particles that look like coffee grounds, blood in your poo, or black, tarry-looking poo – these could be signs of bleeding and perforation of the stomach or gut
  • a frequent sore throat, nose bleeds, and infections – these can be signs of abnormalities in your blood cells, known as agranulocytosis
  • fainting, chest pain, or breathlessness – these can be signs of anaemia
  • high temperature, feeling or being sick, confusion, headache, neck stiffness and sensitivity to light – these can be signs of aseptic meningitis
  • blood in your pee, a decrease in how much pee is passed, feeling or being sick – these can be signs of kidney damage or infection
  • yellow skin or the whites of your eyes turn yellow – these can be signs of jaundice or inflammation of the liver
  • irregular, slow heartbeats caused by high levels of potassium in the blood
  • high temperature, stomach pain and being sick – these can be signs of inflammation of the pancreas

Given the frequency of antipyretic use for the treatment of fever and the relative paucity of adverse events associated with such therapy, treatment of fever with antipyretic agents should be considered safe. However, the following caveats are in order. First, there are probably some populations at increased risk for adverse events, even with episodic treatment employing single agents summarizes recommendations regarding the selection of agents in specific populations. Second, patients should receive clear instructions regarding formulation-specific dosing guidelines and the need to account for antipyretic content of combination multisymptom products. Finally, expectations regarding the response to antipyretic agents should be addressed. Attempts at achieving euthermia through aggressive pharmacotherapy should be modulated by the toxicities of the individual agents. Adherence to these principles should allow for even safer use of these agents in the management of fever.